Pediatric Associates of the North Shore

 

Measles Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q: How effective is the measles vaccine?

 

A: The measles vaccine is very effective. One dose of measles vaccine is about 93% effective at preventing measles if exposed to the virus and two doses is about 97% effective.

 

Q: Could I still get measles if I am fully vaccinated?

 

A: Very few people—about three out of 100—who get two doses of measles vaccine will still get measles if exposed to the virus. Experts aren’t sure why; it could be that their immune systems didn’t respond as well as they should have to the vaccine. But the good news is, fully vaccinated people who get measles are much more likely to have a milder illness, and they are also less likely to spread the disease to other people, including people who can’t get vaccinated because they are too young or have weakened immune systems.

 

Q: Do I ever need a booster vaccine?

 

A: No. People who received two doses of measles vaccine as children according to the U.S. vaccination schedule are considered protected for life and do not ever need a booster dose.

Adults who were not vaccinated as children need at least one dose of measles vaccine, unless they have evidence of immunity.  Adults who are going to be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers, should make sure they have had two doses separated by at least 28 days.

 

Q: Am I protected against measles?

 

A: You are considered protected from measles if you have evidence (medical records) showing any of the following.

  • If you were born before 1957.
  • If you had ever had confirmed measles in the past.
  • If you have a laboratory confirmed immunity (titer) against measles
  • If you had two doses of measles-containing vaccine (e.g. MMR), and you are:
  • A school-aged child (grades K-12)
  • An adult without prior vaccination or disease history and in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission (e.g. colleges, healthcare or international travelers).
  • If you had one dose of measles-containing vaccine (e.g. MMR), and you are:
  • A preschool-aged child
  • An adult without prior vaccination or disease history and not in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.

 

Q: Should we vaccinate children under 1 year of age?

 

A: The local and state health departments have not yet recommended vaccination of this age group.  We anticipate further guidance over the coming week(s) as to what will be defined as a threshold number of cases that would warrant vaccinating children aged 6-11 months.

 

Q: What is the working case definition for suspected measles cases?

 

A: Any person presenting with an acute illness characterized by:

  • Generalized characteristic rash lasting > 3 days; AND
  • Temperature > 101°F or 38.3°C; AND
  • At least one of the following: Cough, runny nose, or conjunctivitis

 

 

 

Dear Editor,

 

I am contacting you today with what I hope you agree is a terrific human interest story for Wilmette and the surrounding area.

 

Our Pediatric office's history which dates back to Dr. Louis Sauer (who developed the vaccines for Whooping cough and Scarlet fever), has been privileged to care for the children of Wilmette and neighboring communities for more than half a century!

 

As one of ten children, our family came from Northfield for our annual check-ups and more.  While driving east on Lake Avenue, I eagerly anticipated my "coveted turn" on the typewriters that welcomed us to Dr. Josephine Earlywines' waiting room (Dr. Sauer's protege).  Since then much has changed in health care, yet the compassionate, loving care, along with the typewriters, have remained a constant at Pediatric Associates.

 

In 1979, Dr. Peter Lewy joined the practice and took over when Dr. Earlywine retired in 1981.  Today the practice is cared for by six top-rated physicians with diverse backgrounds, unique styles and varied interests.  Joining Dr. Lewy over the years are Gail Shorr, M.D., Daniel Lum, M.D., Patricia Brunner, M.D., Shoshana Waskow, M.D. and most recently Bilkis Hirani, M.D.  All are committed to the health and well-being of our future generations.

 

We are excited to announce and reaffirm our commitment to care for our patients at our new address at 1144 Wilmette Avenue. The new location, just "tiny" steps away from our current office has a beautifully remodeled interior with additional space for our growing family practice.  Please visit our web-site for additional background www.pansdocs.com and contact either Dr. Patricia Brunner or Dr. Shoshana Waskow at 847-256-6480 for a tour of our new home or to try out one of the typewriters...but you may have to wait your turn.

 

Respectfully Submitted,

 

Jean Kane Richards

Patient 1962 - 1980

Patients' Mother 1997 - present

Patients' Nurse 2011 - present